Help Zambian Mothers: Double Your Impact this Mother’s Day

A DEVASTATING DROUGHT

As Mother’s Day approaches, we’re reminded of the incredible strength of mothers facing adversity. This year, we’re reaching out to our donor community with a request for your support to help vulnerable mothers and children in Zambia who are struggling under the worst drought Zambia has experienced in the last 20 years.

Zambia’s President, Hakainde Hichilema, recently declared a national disaster due to the devastating drought, which has affected thousands of families, particularly those headed by single mothers. The dry conditions this year have killed over half of the nation’s maize crop and have affected over 8 million people, leaving 6 million more at risk of food insecurity, the majority of whom are children, according to UNICEF. Over 84 of Zambia’s 116 districts are experiencing severe crop failure, leading to hunger, acute malnutrition, and food insecurity.

Large fields of dead corn due to the drought in Zambia in 2024.
A field of dead maize in the Malcolm community, where many of the children who attend the Carol Zulu Primary School live.

According to our staff, in some places, people have resorted to grinding grass seeds as a food alternative, which has negligible nutritional value, but is eaten to fill the stomach and stave off hunger. Many primary and secondary schools have seen large reductions in attendance as parents try to find piecemeal work for their children to make money to purchase food.

As families face hunger and acute malnutrition, the need for support is urgent. Mothers Without Borders is working tirelessly to provide food aid and essential assistance to those affected by the drought through our community school feeding programs and relief meals to the families of the children who attend the Carol Zulu Primary School.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

In the spirit of Mother’s Day, we have a unique opportunity to make a profound difference in the lives of these mothers and their families. A generous donor has pledged to match every donation made between now and the end of May, dollar for dollar, up to $30,000. This means that your gift today will go twice as far, providing essential support like food assistance for communities and school feeding programs, and economic empowerment programs designed to help mothers generate income to support their children. 

  •  A donation of $50 can now become $100, supplying 3 families with sufficient food for a month. 
  • A gift of $100 (doubled as $200), can support a girl or boy in a technical college for a year, providing an opportunity for self-employment in the future. 
  • A donation of $500 (doubled as $1,000), can fund the creation of an additional women’s empowerment club, which provides women with a support system and access to small loans to create revenue-generating opportunities. 

This Mother’s Day, stand in solidarity with mothers in Zambia by making a donation that will change lives. Become a monthly donor on behalf of a mother in your life, and together, we can help mothers and children weather this crisis and build a brighter future.

MEET A GRANDMOTHER AFFECTED BY THE DROUGHT

Meet Aliness, a grandmother who is the backbone of her family’s resilience. Living in the Malcolm community, she cares for her granddaughter Nancy, a 5th grader at the Carol Zulu Primary School, who lost both parents at a young age. Nancy’s aunt, who is severely handicapped, also relies on Aliness’ care.

Aliness prioritizes Nancy’s school attendance, largely because the school provides a healthy lunch each day which relieves a major financial burden. Nancy spends over two hours daily walking to and from school, which she says she doesn’t mind.

While speaking with staff, Aliness spoke about the drought in Zambia and how it is having a profoundly negative impact on her ability to provide for her granddaughter Nancy and her special needs daughter.

A grandmother and her granddaughter smile in front of the grandmother's shop in Zambia.
Grandmother Aliness standing in front of her shop with Nancy.

Before the drought, Aliness was able to make about 50 Kwacha per day (approximately $2.20 USD) selling vegetables from her home. However, because of the drought, all of the corn and other vegetables have died, removing her main source of income.

Nancy's aunt
Nancy's aunt, who requires extra care from Aliness.

In order to make ends meet, she now repackages baking soda into small packets and sells them, bringing in 10 Kwacha per month (approximately $0.44 USD). She also sells eggs, which are purchased less often than vegetables, but which bring in a bit more money. The total amount of money that she is able to generate has decreased significantly due to the drought, reducing the meals she is able to provide for her daughter and granddaughter to one meal a day.

The drought has affected all Zambians, especially grandmothers, mothers, and children. However, the spirit of resilience through hard times is evident, especially in Aliness. She  is committed to supporting her family the best that she can, hoping to provide a better life for her granddaughter.

Join us in supporting this hardworking family and other grandmothers, mothers, and children in need this Mother’s Day by donating to Mothers Without Borders.

Nancy walks home from the Carol Zulu Primary School through dry fields.
Nancy walks home from the Carol Zulu Primary School through dry fields.
Nancy demonstrates how her family cooks their meals.
A grandmother and her granddaughter smile in front of the grandmother's shop in Zambia.
Grandmother Aliness standing in front of her shop with Nancy.

Meet Aliness, a grandmother who is the backbone of her family’s resilience. Living in the Malcolm community, she cares for her granddaughter Nancy, a 5th grader at the Carol Zulu Primary School, who lost both parents at a young age. Nancy’s aunt, who is severely handicapped, also relies on Aliness’ care.

Aliness prioritizes Nancy’s school attendance, largely because the school provides a healthy lunch each day which relieves a major financial burden. Nancy spends over two hours daily walking to and from school, which she says she doesn’t mind.

While speaking with staff, Aliness spoke about the drought in Zambia and how it is having a profoundly negative impact on her ability to provide for her granddaughter Nancy and her special needs daughter.

Before the drought, Aliness was able to make about 50 Kwacha per day (approximately $2.20 USD) selling vegetables from her home. However, because of the drought, all of the corn and other vegetables have died, removing her main source of income.

Nancy's aunt
Nancy's aunt, who requires extra care from Aliness.

In order to make ends meet, she now repackages baking soda into small packets and sells them, bringing in 10 Kwacha per month (approximately $0.44 USD). She also sells eggs, which are purchased less often than vegetables, but which bring in a bit more money. The total amount of money that she is able to generate has decreased significantly due to the drought, reducing the meals she is able to provide for her daughter and granddaughter to one meal a day.

The drought has affected all Zambians, especially grandmothers, mothers, and children. However, the spirit of resilience through hard times is evident, especially in Aliness. She  is committed to supporting her family the best that she can, hoping to provide a better life for her granddaughter.

Join us in supporting this hardworking family and other grandmothers, mothers, and children in need this Mother’s Day by donating to Mothers Without Borders.

Nancy walks home from the Carol Zulu Primary School through dry fields.
Nancy walks home from the Carol Zulu Primary School through dry fields.
Nancy demonstrates how her family cooks their meals.

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